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PERRCoLATE Project: Translation, Application, and Evaluation of Public Health Emergency Communication Products

PERRCoLATE Project researchers are focusing on the translation, application, and evaluation of research products and trainings to improve public health preparedness and response practices, policies, and programs.

PERRCoLATE Project researchers are focusing on the translation, application, and evaluation of research products and trainings developed by the CDC-funded Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRC) and Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLC) with the goal of utilizing these products to improve public health preparedness and response practices, policies, and programs.

PERRCoLATEIn 2008, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has funded nine Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Centers (PERRCs) to conduct public health systems research on emergency preparedness and response. In 2010, the CDC also funded 14 Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLCs) to provide training and consultation services around emergency preparedness and response to state, local, and tribal public health authorities. While major strides have been made to improve communication during public health emergencies and significant research and evidence-based trainings have been generated from the PERRCs and PERLCs, wide implementation of innovations to improve public health practices, programs, and the workforce have lagged.

The PERRCoLATE Project's specific aims include:

  • Broad diffusion of information regarding public health preparedness and response communication products with all project partners, stakeholders and grantees;
  • Dissemination, implementation and utilization of public health preparedness and response communications products/tools within the Northwest region;
  • Successful approaches for building capacity to reduce or eliminate the gap between public health preparedness and response communications evidence and innovation and practice;
  • Identification of structural and individual characteristics of public health organizations that will ensure successful implementation and adoption of public health preparedness and response communications tools; and
  • Broad dissemination (federal and policy) of lessons learned, recommendations, materials and activities.

The project takes part over the following phases:

Phase 1: Inventory all PERRC/PERLC evidence-based public health preparedness and response communication tools and products for subject matter review.

Phase 2: Obtain feedback from regional and national stakeholders regarding known barriers and aids to implementing high-priority tools and products.

Phase 3: Implement selected tools at pilot demonstration site, conduct pre-/post-assessments on barriers and aids to adoption, use, and sustainability.

Phase 4: Collate findings from Phases 1–3 regarding high-priority products, implementation realities, and lessons learned into a web-based tutorial.

Synthesis: National dissemination via a virtual symposium of project outcomes on June 27, 2017. A recording of the symposium is available to watch online.

This project is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) is the national coordinating center, working in collaboration with CDC, to support this work.

Project period: January 1, 2016 to August 14, 2017.

Research Team

Janet Baseman, PhD, MPH
Principal Investigator

Susan Allan, MD, JD, MPH
Co-Investigator

Hilary Karasz, PhD, MA
Co-Investigator

Hendrika Meischke, PhD, MPH
Co-Investigator

Luann D’Ambrosio, MEd
Co-Investigator

Debra Revere, MLIS, MA
Research Scientist and Project Manager

Sarah Cohen, MFA, PhD
Instructional Designer

Sarah Manchanda
Learning Technologies Specialist

Janell Blackmer
Center Operations Manager

Rick Bruch
Web Computing Specialist

Hsio-Ying Lo
Fiscal Specialist

Past Contributors

Molly Feder
Research Assistant

Meghan Fitzpatrick
Communications Specialist