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Two NWCPHP Faculty Members Think for PHAB

On December 2-3, 2009, Chuck Treser and Carl Osaki attended a Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) Think Tank meeting as two of approximately 30 environmental health leaders from across the nation who were gathered to address environmental health concerns.

December 14, 2009

On December 2–3, 2009, Mr. Chuck Treser and Mr. Carl Osaki attended a Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) Think Tank meeting in Alexandria, Virginia. They were two of approximately 30 environmental health leaders from across the nation who were gathered to address a PHAB concern about environmental health.

Nationally, public health is entering a new era of accreditation standards and protocol. PHAB has established a number of beta sites to begin assessing and accrediting public health departments and public health systems. The meeting in Virginia was called to help address a PHAB concern that environmental health issues be adequately addressed in the accreditation standards ultimately adopted by PHAB.

In addition to PHAB, the December 2–3, 2009 meeting was convened by the CDC Office of Chief of Public Health Practice, and the CDC National Center for Environmental Health, Environmental Health Services Branch. The purpose was to gain a better understanding of the benefits and opportunities, as well as the challenges, presented by the proposed public health department accreditation standards and process.

Mr. Treser and Mr. Osaki, as well as others present, were tasked with leading the development of actionable items that will help environmental public health practitioners and public health leaders use the accreditation standards to improve the practice of environmental health. Short-term and long-term plans to inform environmental public health professionals of the benefits of public health department accreditation were initiated at this meeting. This group of environmental public health leaders began to develop methods to monitor, measure, and evaluate the accreditation process and its impact on environmental public health, as well as working to identify how environmental public health professionals can take advantage of these accreditation opportunities.

For more information, visit the PHAB website.

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