You are here: Home / Communications / News / Research Assistant Dacey Storzbach to Address Healthcare Inequality in Oregon

Research Assistant Dacey Storzbach to Address Healthcare Inequality in Oregon

NWCPHP Research Assistant Dacey Storzbach recently completed her Master of Science in Public Health Genetics and has been awarded funding to pursue her medical degree at Oregon Health & Sciences University.
Research Assistant Dacey Storzbach to Address Healthcare Inequality in Oregon

Dacey Storzbach

NWCPHP Research Assistant Dacey Storzbach recently completed her Master of Science in Public Health Genetics and has been awarded funding to pursue her medical degree at Oregon Health & Sciences University.

July 10, 2014

NWCPHP Research Assistant Dacey Storzbach was recently awarded full funding for medical school at Oregon Health & Sciences University through the Scholars for Healthy Oregon Initiative. The program was established in 2013 by the State of Oregon to address current challenges around high tuition costs for students and a shortage of healthcare professionals in Oregon’s rural and underserved communities.

Since joining NWCPHP in 2012, Dacey has been part of the evaluation team and has also carried out special assignments related to NWCPHP’s emergency preparedness projects and other key activities.

“Dacey has been a real asset to NWCPHP,” said Luann D’Ambrosio, NWCPHP Associate Director. “We are really going to miss her critical thinking skills, attention to detail, and skilled writing contributions to our evaluation activities and special projects. She will make an excellent physician.”

Reflecting on her time at NWCPHP, Dacey said: “It’s been a very supportive environment where I’ve been given responsibility for leading projects and allowed to be creative about finding the most effective way to accomplish aims. I've had a lot of opportunities to analyze data, conduct literature reviews, and become an expert on topics.”

A recent graduate from the University of Washington’s interdisciplinary Public Health Genetics program, Dacey will return to her hometown of Portland, Oregon to begin her journey into clinical medicine in mid-August. She will attend intensive classes for a year and a half, and then begin clinical rotations. She anticipates fulfilling her residency in family medicine, pediatrics, or emergency medicine. After completing her residency, Dacey will “repay” her medical school funding by working with underserved urban or rural populations for five years.

Dacey’s motivation to work with underserved populations was a key factor in her being selected for the program’s four-year funding, and it’s been a driving force in her decision to attend medical school, ever since she served a year as an AmeriCorps member after her undergraduate studies.

As an AmeriCorps member in Jacksonville, Florida, working alongside physicians treating adolescents with chronic disorders and disabilities “was an exhilarating experience,” said Dacey. “I saw how I could make a really positive difference in people’s lives by diagnosing problems and addressing them, and I knew this was the right path for me.”

Dacey is very excited about beginning her medical training. And having juggled school and a research assistantship for the past two years, she is looking forward to focusing on medical school—with maybe a little time set aside for kickboxing and hiking with her dog.

STORY TO SHARE?

We love public health stories! We feature them in our postcard series, Spotlight on the Field, and news items. Please contact us to share your story!