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2015 Summer Institute Explores Health Equity

Participants in the 2015 Summer Institute will explore ideas for creating equitable health conditions through the new Implementing Health Equity course and through plenary sessions.
2015 Summer Institute Explores Health Equity

Participants in the 2014 Summer Institute for Public Health Practice.

Participants in the 2015 Summer Institute will explore ideas for creating equitable health conditions through course work and plenary sessions.

April 1, 2015

Today’s public health system helped create better and longer lives across the country. But not all communities have benefited equally from improvements in sanitation, transportation, access to medicine, and other factors impacting health. Many health inequities persist.

“Public health professionals observe health disparities in their daily work and therefore can play a key role in correcting them,” said NWCPHP Training Specialist Barbara Rose, MPH.

Scholars at the 2015 Summer Institute for Public Health Practice will explore ideas for creating equitable conditions for health through course work and daily plenary sessions.

All courses will touch on equity issues, with the new Promoting Health Equity course providing a more in-depth exploration of the material. This train the trainer course uses interactive exercises and case studies to examine health equity terminology and concepts. Participants will also explore community tools for addressing issues that produce inequities, including racism, gun violence, air pollution, food security, and youth employment.

Keynote speakers at the plenary sessions will discuss how data, community partnerships, and leadership can support everyone's right to live a healthy life.

“Throughout history, health disparities have powerfully influenced the evolution of our health care and public health systems.” said NWCPHP Director and Summer Institute host Tao Kwan-Gett, MD, MPH.

Disparities driven by poverty in American cities in the 1800's spurred the evolution of almshouses for the poor into charity hospitals. Health disparities faced by women and children at the start of the Progressive Era in the early 1900's stimulated the creation of the federal Children's Bureau, which tackled the high rates of maternal and infant mortality at the time. Health disparities by race and ethnicity during the Civil Rights movement in the 1960's led minority communities to create community health centers.

Although much has been accomplished, many health inequities persist today.

Motor vehicle-related deaths are higher among American Indians and Alaska Natives than for other races and ethnicities. Queer youth have an increased risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors, suicide attempts, and suicide compared to straight youth. Teen births, infant mortality, homicide, and obesity are all higher in communities with greater levels of income inequality.

These are just some of the examples illustrating that more work can be done to ensure all communities have the same opportunities to be healthy and to thrive. “Today, health reform gives communities, health care, and public health a historic opportunity to work together to address disparities,” said Kwan-Gett.

Join NWCPHP for the 2015 Summer Institute for Public Health Practice and explore new ideas for creating equitable conditions for health. Early bird rates end June 1, 2015.

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