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The Science of Influenza Vaccine Development: Implications for Practitioners

May 22, 2007. In this one-hour Hot Topics webinar, David Cho, PhD, MPH, explains what researchers are doing to overcome the challenges of a pandemic strain and the implications of this research for busy practitioners during a pandemic.

Quick Facts

Topics: Epidemiology, Infectious Disease & Immunizations

Format: Webinar

Time: 1 hour

Cost: Free

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Description

Each year in the United States influenza complications are responsible for 200,000 hospitalizations and approximately 36,000 deaths. To prevent another influenza pandemic and reduce the number of influenza epidemics, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) supports research to find out how influenza viruses work, and develop better vaccines to prevent and treat infections. In this one-hour Hot Topics webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, David Cho, PhD, MPH, explains what researchers are doing to overcome the challenges of a pandemic strain and the implications of this research for busy practitioners during a pandemic.

Air date: May 22, 2007

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the basic scientific differences between seasonal and pandemic influenza
  • Explain what researchers are doing to overcome the challenges that a pandemic strain brings, including shortening the time interval with innovative approaches to vaccine development
  • Explain strategies that busy practitioners should consider if a pandemic occurs and the vaccine is delayed

Intended Audience

State and local public health practitioners; Emergency response coordinators; Public Health Nurses

Slides

Quick Facts

Topics: Epidemiology, Infectious Disease & Immunizations

Format: Webinar

Time: 1 hour

Cost: Free

Presenter

David Cho, PhD, MPH, is an influenza program officer within the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (DMID) in NIAID at the National Institutes of Health. His duties include the management of an international extramural research portfolio of grants and contracts, initiative planning and writing, some budgetary responsibilities, and developing priorities within related scientific program areas.

Competencies

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