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Salmonella Outbreak in 2008: Was It the Tomatoes?

August 26, 2008. In this one-hour Hot Topics webinar, Mack Sewell, DrPH, MS, describes the recognition and investigation of the 2008 Saintpaul serotype of Salmonella outbreak.

Quick Facts

Topics: Infectious Disease & Immunizations, Epidemiology

Format: Webinar

Time: 1 hour

Cost: Free

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Description

This Hot Topics webinar was held in the middle of 2008 oubreak of the rare Saintpaul serotype of Salmonella enterica that caused at least 1,300 cases of salmonellosis food poisoning, leading to over 250 hospitalizations. It was the largest reported salmonellosis outbreak in the U.S. since 1985. At the time the FDA was changing its position regarding the source or sources of the Salmonella, but as of the air daite had narrowed its list of suspects to raw tomatoes, fresh jalapeƱo peppers, fresh serrano peppers, and fresh cilantro. In this one-hour Hot Topics webinar, which is part of the Hot Topics series, Mack Sewell, DrPH, MS, describes the recognition and investigation of the outbreak. He presents and discusses the epidemiologic findings to-date from a variety of case control studies, trace-back investigations, and microbiologic testing to address the question: Was it the tomatoes?

Air date: August 26, 2008

Learning Objectives

  • Identify key factors that allowed for the recognition of the Salmonella Saintpaul outbreak.
  • Describe important findings from the epidemiology, laboratory, and trace-back investigations.
  • Discuss important observations and lessons for future outbreaks.

Intended Audience

Local and state public health practitioners; Public health nurses; State and local epidemiology staff

Slides

Quick Facts

Topics: Infectious Disease & Immunizations, Epidemiology

Format: Webinar

Time: 1 hour

Cost: Free

Presenter

C. Mack Sewell, DrPH, MS, received a masters in microbiology from Colorado State University. He worked there for several years as a microbiologist before going to the University of Texas School of Public Health, where he received a doctorate in public health in 1982. A native New Mexican, Dr. Sewell returned to his home state in 1984 to work as an epidemiologist with the New Mexico State Health and Environment Department in Santa Fe. He has been the state epidemiologist and director of the epidemiology and response division since 1989. He is a past president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE).

Competencies

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