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Curriculum

The 2018 Leadership Institute uses a health equity lens and life-course perspective to approach leadership training. Scholars learn through a variety of formats, including problem-based learning, in which small groups of scholars take initiative to learn leadership skills together through relevant, real-world, and timely case studies.

2018 NWPHLI Curriculum

The 2018 Leadership Institute uses a health equity lens and life-course perspective to approach leadership training. Scholars learn through a variety of formats, including problem-based learning, in which small groups of scholars take initiative to learn leadership skills together through relevant, real-world, and timely case studies.

Approach

The leadership institute draws a diverse cohort of scholars from public health, primary care, and beyond whose work connects with maternal and child health (MCH) or population health from a life-course perspective.

In group-based and individual experiences, scholars build and practice skills necessary for leading collaboratively and managing change in a new era. These skills help leaders work effectively with communities, colleagues, teams, health care systems, community-based organizations, Accountable Communities of Health, Coordinated Care Organizations, and policymakers.

Scholars learn from and interact with practice-based faculty and public health leaders about leadership approaches to pressing topics related to the life-course perspective, health equity, and social justice.

Learning Formats

The cohort participates in in group assignments, panels, lectures, webinars, and discussions, and uses problem-based learning to explore real-life situations public health leaders face in various parts of the field. Participants complete curriculum via:

Three on-site sessions. Each three-day on-site session takes place in Seattle, WA. The on-site sessions—in May, August, and November—are enhanced by distance-based learning components. At each on-site, scholars learn from faculty, presenters, panelists, and each other about topics relevant to leadership development. Past topics have included change management, conflict resolution, applying a life-course perspective, systems thinking, peer coaching, understanding adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), communicating with elected officials, and more. (View the 2017 schedule as a sample.) At the final on-site session, a panel of local public health leaders reflect on their experiences, then talk to scholars in small groups.

Distance-learning assignments. Between on-sites, small groups of scholars and a faculty mentor work on problem-based learning cases via phone or video. Scholars also plan time to prepare cases or other activities (about 4–8 hours per month). Scholars are encouraged to watch NWCPHP’s Hot Topics in Practice webinars, in which subject-matter experts describe lessons from their work on pressing public health issues.

Leadership project. Each scholar will work with their employer and a Leadership Institute faculty mentor to develop a leadership-related project specific to their agency. The project is intended to exercise and hone leadership skills scholars are tying to build to achieve goals.

Individual leadership plan/360 assessment. Each scholar works with their colleagues to complete a 360-degree assessment of their leadership skills. Using what they learn, they develop an individual leadership plan to define and reflect on their personal leadership and career goals, and work with faculty coaches to help them refine those goals.

Problem-based learning (PBL). Faculty mentors support small learning groups of scholars as they build competencies by examining real-world public health leadership cases, identify key issues, research solutions, and apply findings to each case. This approach allows scholars to work with the complexities of real-world leadership challenges. It also encourages both self-directed learners and team players, and practice contributing in a team environment.

Alumni mentoring. Part-way through the institute, each scholar is paired with a well-matched mentor who completed the Leadership Institute in the past. Scholars and mentors have several conversations about career development and getting the most out of their leadership development experience.

Learning Goals

The Northwest Public Health Leadership Institute incorporates competencies developed and adapted from a combination of sources, primarily the Council on Linkages and the Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health. View the list.