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Responding to Whooping Cough in Washington State

In the July Hot Topics a panel of public health leaders, still in the midst of the outbreak, will share their perspectives on declaring and responding to the epidemic.

In the July Hot Topics a panel of public health leaders, still in the midst of the outbreak, will share their perspectives on declaring and responding to the epidemic.

July 3, 2012

Leading the everyday tasks of a public health agency is important, but leadership during an epidemic is essential. In April 2012 the Washington State Department of Health declared a whooping cough epidemic. As of June 23rd there were 2,647 reported cases throughout the state and the numbers could increase by the end of the year. In the July Hot Topics a panel of public health leaders, still in the midst of the outbreak, will share their perspectives on declaring and responding to the epidemic.

Mary Selecky, Washington State Secretary of Health, will lead off the panel with an overview of the outbreak timeline and discuss her decision to declare an epidemic for the first time in her 13-year career as Secretary of Health. She will also describe collaboration efforts with the Governor's office and the CDC.

Maxine Hayes, MD, MPH, Washington State Health Officer, will explain how the disease cycles through populations and why incident rates vary across the state. She will also describe how her office proactively worked with the media to educate families with young children about reducing their risk of infection.

Snohomish County has one of the highest number of cases in the state. Gary Goldbaum, MD, MPH, Health Officer for the Snohomish Health District, will discuss how his Communicable Disease Control Division is responding to the outbreak and their work with community groups, schools, and health care providers to increase public awareness for vaccinations.

The panel will be followed by a brief dialog between presenters and a question and answer period with webinar participants. Register now to learn important leadership strategies for responding to an epidemic.

Responding to Whooping Cough in Washington State

Date: Tuesday, July 31, 2012, noon to 1:00 p.m. (PDT)

Target Audiences

  • Local and state public health practitioners
  • Local and state emergency management staff
  • Public health nurses

Presenters

Mary Selecky helped create the Washington State Department of Health in 1989 and has served as its Secretary of Health since March 1999. Prior to working for the state, she served for 20 years as the administrator of the Northeast Tri-County Health District in Colville, Washington. Additional public health leadership roles include two terms as the president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, a position on the Board of Directors for the National Association of City and County Health Officials, and president of the Washington State Association of Local Public Health Officials.

Maxine Hayes, MD, MPH, is the State Health Officer for the Washington State Department of Health. As the state’s top public health doctor, her role includes advising the governor and the secretary of health on issues ranging from health promotion and chronic disease prevention to emergency response. Dr. Hayes is a board certified pediatrician and is considered one of the nation’s top maternal and child health experts. She is a clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, a clinical faculty professor at the University of Washington School of Public Health, a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and a member of the Institute of Medicine.

Gary M. Goldbaum, MD, MPH, has been the Health Officer and Director of the Snohomish Health District in Snohomish County, Washington since 2007. A graduate of the University of Colorado School of Medicine and the University of Washington School of Public Health, he has been certified by the American Board of Family Practice and the American Board of Preventive Medicine. He was the Health Officer for Thurston and Skagit counties, also in Washington State, from 1987 to 1989, served in multiple leadership roles at Public Health - Seattle & King County from 1989 to 2007, saw patients at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle from 1989 to 2007, and directed the University of Washington Preventive Medicine Residency from 1992 to 2002.

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