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Connecting Nature and Health: A Primer on Therapeutic Gardens

Daniel Winterbottom, a landscape architect, will be presenting on March 3, 2011 about therapeutic gardens.
Connecting Nature and Health: A Primer on Therapeutic Gardens

A children's garden in Guatemala. Photo by Daniel Winterbottom.

February 17, 2011

Daniel Winterbottom, a landscape architect, will be presenting on Thursday, March 3rd on therapeutic gardens. He will be at the University of Washington Seattle campus and his presentation is titled, "Connecting Nature and Health: A Primer on Therapeutic Gardens."

This presentation is free and open to the public and is sponsored by the Healthy Places Research Group. The Healthy Places Research Group is a joint effort of NWCPHP and the University of Washington's Department of Urban Design and Planning. This group welcomes public health and planning researchers, students, practitioners, faculty and others interested in exploring the relationship between the built environment and the health of communities.

Daniel Winterbottom, ASLA, is a landscape architect and Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at the University of Washington. His firm, Winterbottom Design Inc., focuses on healing/restorative gardens. Educated as a sculptor, Winterbottom holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Tufts University and a Master of Landscape Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. His research interests include the landscape as a cultural expression, ecological urban design, and restorative/healing landscapes.

In 1995, he developed a design/build program, through which he and his students work with communities to design and build projects that provide amenities and address social and ecological concerns. Projects include a public wash facility in rural Mexico, a garden for children with HIV/AIDS in New York City, healing gardens at Cancer Lifeline in Seattle, and a mother/child garden in a maximum security women’s correctional facility near New York City. Winterbottom has developed a participatory design process that is used in these service-learning projects to create responsive design solutions.

Winterbottom will present at the University of Washington in the Health Sciences Center, I-wing, Room 132 (Rotunda), from 3:30–5:00 p.m. on March 3, 2011. The presentation will be followed by open discussion.

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