You are here: Home / Communications / News / Sarah Paliulis: The invisible presence

Sarah Paliulis: The invisible presence

Sarah is the Web computing specialist who brings our distance-learning courses to life. During each month’s Hot Topics webinar, Sarah is the invisible presence in the control booth, making sure the presenter can communicate with a regional audience of public health professionals.
Sarah Paliulis: The invisible presence

Scottish country dancing at Alls Faire, Bonney Lake, WA, June 2010. Sarah is in black vest.

July 7, 2010

Sarah Paliulis. Does the name ring a bell?

Sarah is the Web computing specialist who brings our distance-learning courses to life. During each month’s Hot Topics webinar, Sarah is the invisible presence in the control booth, making sure the presenter can communicate with a regional audience of public health professionals.

Her invisible presence is also felt across campus on those big days like commencement, when rich, warm tones ring out from the UW bell tower. Sarah and a circle of friends pull the ropes of 200- to 600-pound bells in the only change ringing tower on the US West Coast. Change ringing is like the jazz of the bell ringing world – instead of reading music and chiming in on beat, change ringers try out all the patterns and permutations of a limited number of bells.

Sarah also plays the more traditional English handbells with the Emerald City Ringers, the largest handbell choir in the Northwest.  She has been playing bells since, as an undergraduate at Williams College in Massachusetts, she was intrigued by an ad that asked “Can you read music and do you like to wear white gloves?” Sarah, a former high school percussionist, hadn’t heard of English handbells, but soon got hooked. She says with a chuckle that she is “into heavy metal” – the deep bass bells that require two hands and make a great vibrating sound.

She also loves folk dancing – both Lithuanian and Scottish. She wears her late grandmother’s colorful wool skirt and vest while dancing in a Lithuanian folk dancing troupe. The troupe performed this spring for Lithuanian Independence Day, for the Northwest Folklife Festival and for the Baltic Rites of Spring. This month, her Scottish dance troupe will perform at highland games in Mount Vernon and Enumclaw, Washington.

Sarah has been with the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice since December 2006. We recruited her from the School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina, where she had been an instructional technologist. Sarah says she was attracted to Seattle because of the mild weather. (She reported this without irony, bundled as she was in a thick, gray sweater in early July.)

STORY TO SHARE?

We love public health stories! We feature them in our postcard series, Spotlight on the Field, and news items. Please contact us to share your story!