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Rosenbaum Works to Prevent Colorectal Cancer

Former NWCPHP Research Assistant, Anna Rosenbaum, MPH, MSW, has a new mission: to reduce disparities in colorectal cancer and to unite those working on cancer prevention in the state of California.
Rosenbaum Works to Prevent Colorectal Cancer

Anna Rosenbaum

November 9, 2011

Former NWCPHP Research Assistant, Anna Rosenbaum, MPH, MSW, has a new mission: to reduce disparities in colorectal cancer and to unite those working on cancer prevention in the state of California. Of cancers that affect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US. And in California, the disease disproportionately affects racial minority populations—especially African Americans and Asian Pacific Islanders.

As the new Program Manager for the California Colorectal Cancer Program at the Public Health Institute in Sacramento, Rosenbaum will develop, implement, and evaluate patient and health care provider education programs that aim to increase knowledge of colorectal cancer screening among underserved populations in California. She will also support several coalitions that bring together individuals and organizations to work towards improving cancer control.

Rosenbaum was a Research Assistant at NWCPHP from 2008 to 2009. In this role, she coordinated the Leadership Institute activities. "It entailed a lot of the same things that I will be doing in my new position such as supporting professionals in the field, and organizing conferences. I gained a lot of program management experience at NWCPHP that I am able to apply in this new capacity."

In June 2011, Rosenbaum graduated with a joint Master's degree in Social Work and an MPH from the Community-Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) program at the University of Washington (UW). About her time at UW, Rosenbaum says, "In COPHP we did a lot of community outreach and organizing work. I really enjoyed it, and I am excited to put it to use by bringing together people who don't necessarily speak the same [professional] language."

Originally from the Bay Area, Rosenbaum is happy to return to her home state to work for the Public Health Institute. She says the nonprofit organization's mission and goals to address health equity are very much aligned with her personal and professional principles.

Though she comes from a background in reproductive health education, Rosenbaum feels her new position is a good fit. "Colorectal cancer isn't exactly dinner table conversation," Rosenbaum comments. "But it is very preventable and has a high survival rate if it is caught early."

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