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Automated Phone Surveys for Disease Investigation

At the May Hot Topics in Practice webinar, emergency preparedness and response staff from Clark County Washington discuss lessons learned from implementing Emergency Community Notification System.

At the May Hot Topics in Practice webinar, emergency preparedness and response staff from Clark County Washington discuss lessons learned from implementing Emergency Community Notification System.

May 3, 2012

In the current era of diminishing resources, public health professionals are always looking for efficient ways to improve services. For disease investigators, the Emergency Community Notification System (ECNS) can be an effective tool to reach communities during an emergency.

At the next Hot Topics in Practice webinar on Tuesday, May 8 from noon to 1:00 p.m. (PDT), emergency preparedness and response staff from Clark County Washington will discuss lessons learned from implementing ECNS.

ECNS works like 911 in reverse and allows agencies to contact pre-identified groups in the community, poll them, and record their responses. This automated, cost-effective process helps epidemiologists and public health nurses quickly identify the portion of the population that will require follow-up interviews.

Register now to learn how implementing this system in your health jurisdiction can reduce paperwork, save time and money, increase compliance with control measures, and contribute to more efficient use of staff time.

This webinar is part of an ongoing series that features current issues in public health practice. These monthly webinars can be accessed online at no charge. For more upcoming webinars or to listen to archived sessions, visit Hot Topics in Practice.

Automated Phone Surveys for Disease Investigation

Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2012, noon to 1:00 p.m. (PDT)

Target Audiences

  • Local and state public health practitioners
  • Emergency response coordinators
  • Epidemiologists
  • Public Health Nurses

Presenters
Lianne Martinez has an A.S. in Criminal Justice and a background in community corrections. She currently works as a Region IV Public Health Emergency Response Coordinator in Washington State. In this capacity, Lianne coordinates the region’s Medical Reserve Corps and serves as Sections Chief on a Type 3 All-Hazards Incident Management Team.

Richard Konrad was trained as a teacher and taught in secondary schools and community colleges before joining the Fire Service. After serving as the Operations Deputy for a mid-sized municipal fire department, he left to help develop one of the earliest Associate Degree Programs in Emergency Medical Services. After moving to the Vancouver-Portland area, he served as the administrator of a regional trauma care and Emergency Management System planning agency. Richard currently works as a Region IV Public Health Emergency Response Coordinator in Washington State.

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