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PCORP Program Welcomes New Scholars for 2017

The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Partnership (PCORP) program recently admitted 10 new scholars into the 2017-19 training cohort.
PCORP Program Welcomes New Scholars for 2017

Scholars at the 2016 PCORP Summer Institute review their project proposals.

The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Partnership (PCORP) program recently admitted 10 new scholars into the final training cohort. Participants will spend two years in the program, beginning with online training this spring.

March 24, 2017

The Patient Centered Outcomes Research Partnership (PCORP) program, housed at NWCPHP, recently admitted 10 scholars into the 2017–19 training cohort. Over the next two years, the new participants will take part in online and in-person learning activities and one-on-one mentoring from University of Washington faculty and advisors in their organizations.

“We believe this is a very strong cohort, and one that continues to represent a diversity of backgrounds and organizations,” said Program Director Larry Kessler, ScD, Professor in the Department of Health Services.

The PCORP curriculum is part of a five-year effort to train a cadre of scientists, clinicians, and health care managers in conducting research on patient-centered outcomes and the comparative effectiveness of medical treatments. The goal is to build individual and organizational capacity around the country in these fields. As such, the program selects trainees from a broad array of partner organizations and encourages them to network with one another as well as research faculty during their time in the program.

In addition to in-person and online learning activities, scholars work with faculty and organizational mentors to conduct a research project that answers an important question at their health care organization. Topics from past scholars include investigating patient-reported outcomes for depression screening, the use of pediatric ultrasounds for appendicitis, health care homes for Native Hawaiians, and pain management among American Indians and Alaskan Natives.

The new cohort's research questions include the integration of behavioral health into primary care, the effectiveness of group visits to manage chronic pain, obesity management, reducing catheter-associated infections, breast feeding success, and others. “Like our health care system, these projects cover a broad range of subjects,” said Kessler. “The aim of the PCORP training and mentoring program will be to provide each scholar with a foundational skill set to tackle these issues, no matter the topic.”

Scholars in the 2017–19 cohort begin their online training in April and will meet in person this coming July in Seattle for a week-long training institute.

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