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Becky Bartlein Heads to Cote d'Ivoire

Former NWCPHP research assisstant, Becky Bartlein, MPH, is one of 19 fellows chosen for the inaugural year of the Fulbright Public Policy Fellowship.
Becky Bartlein Heads to Cote d'Ivoire

Cote d'Ivoire Fulbright Public Policy Fellows, Josh Dankoff, Justine Davis, and Becky Bartlein.

Former NWCPHP research assistant, Becky Bartlein, MPH, is one of 19 fellows chosen for the inaugural year of the Fulbright Public Policy Fellowship.

September 4, 2012

Next week, one of NWCPHP's former research assistants will be flying to Cote d'Ivoire to spend the next year working for the Ministry of Health. In August, she was meeting Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Becky Bartlein, MPH, is one of 19 fellows chosen for the inaugural year of the Fulbright Public Policy Fellowship. This new arm of the Fulbright Fellowship Program aims to provide US graduate students and young public policy professionals with the opportunity for hands-on international experience while simultaneously strengthening the public sector abroad.

"I'm excited to get a glimpse into how their Ministry of Health works," said Bartlein. "It's a rare opportunity to get an inside look at the policy development process in a foreign country."

Bartlein, who graduated from the University of Washington Department of Global Health in 2010, will be in Cote d'Ivoire for one year. She will spend 80 percent of her time as a special assistant to the Minister.

"I'll be doing whatever needs to be done. That could be writing policy briefings, preparing for meetings, or helping to write speeches," said Bartlein.

Bartlein Fullbright Scholars

All of the Fulbright Public Policy Fellows met in Washington DC in August. Bartlein is viewer's left of Secretary Clinton.

The other 20 percent of her time will be spent on academic research, similar to traditional Fulbright Fellowships. Bartlein proposed a study on how Cote d'Ivoire's health care model has shifted and how that has impacted access to care. Cote d'Ivoire went from a fee-for-service model, to universal health care coverage, to only covering maternal and child health care. She'll be working closely with the Institut de la Santé Publique, the National Public Health Institute.

Bartlein isn't only excited about her work, she's also excited to return to West Africa. She was formerly in the Peace Corps in Senegal, so she's familiar with some of the context of the region. "I'm really excited to get to experience urban West African life versus my time in rural Senegal," Bartlein said. "I'm also excited to use my French in a professional application."

Bartlein is one of three fellows headed to Cote d'Ivoire. The other two will be working in the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Education.

The Department of State blogged about the Fellows visiting for the program inauguration in DC, complete with a photo of the Fellows and an animated Secretary Clinton.

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